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Bulking while using Nutrient Dense and Insulinogenic foods


Ok, to build on last week post on Nutrient Density this one is for the athlete looking to bulk up more wisely.  Avoiding processed nutritionally poor carbs.

Marty’s article goes into nutrient dense higher energy density foods that can be used for by athletes or people wanting GAIN weight.

The article highlights more insulinogenic nutrient dense foods that could be used by metabolically healthy people to:

  • Strategically “carb up” before events,
  • Intentionally trigger insulin spikes (Carb Back loading” or “Keto Diets”)
  • Maximize growth for people who are underweight while still maintaining high levels of nutrition.

The multi criteria analysis is based on both nutrient density and percentage insulinogenic calories, so some of these foods maybe surprising for you all.

**The foods listed below represent the top 10% of the USDA food database prioritized for higher insulin load, higher nutrient density and higher energy density.  In terms of macronutrients they come out at 36% protein, 15% fat and 44% net carbohydrates.

While these foods might not be ideal for someone with diabetes they actually look like a pretty healthy list of foods compared to the “food like products” that you’d find in the isles of the supermarket.

This chart shows the nutrients provided by the top 10% of the foods using this ranking compared to the average of all foods in the USDA foods database.**

Vegetables

food ND insulin load (g/100g) calories/100g MCA
watercress 19 2 11 1.2
seaweed (wakame) 13 11 45 1.0
shiitake mushrooms 5 72 296 0.9
spinach 17 4 23 0.9
brown mushrooms 11 5 22 0.7
asparagus 15 3 22 0.7
chard 14 3 19 0.7
seaweed (kelp) 9 10 43 0.7
yeast extract spread 8 27 185 0.6
white mushroom 11 5 22 0.6
spirulina 10 6 26 0.6
mung beans 9 4 19 0.6
Chinese cabbage 12 2 12 0.5
celery flakes 4 42 319 0.5
portabella mushrooms 11 5 29 0.5
broccoli 11 5 35 0.4
parsley 12 5 36 0.4
lettuce 12 2 15 0.4
radicchio 8 4 23 0.4
shiitake mushroom 9 7 39 0.4

 

Animal Products

food ND insulin load (g/100g) calories/100g MCA
ham (lean only) 11 17 113 0.7
veal liver 9 26 192 0.7
beef liver 9 25 175 0.7
lamb liver 11 20 168 0.7
lamb kidney 11 15 112 0.6
chicken breast 8 22 148 0.5
pork liver 7 23 165 0.5
chicken liver 9 20 172 0.5
pork chop 7 23 172 0.5
veal 6 24 151 0.5

 

Seafood

food ND insulin load (g/100g) calories/100g MCA
cod 14 48 290 1.5
crab 15 14 83 1.1
lobster 14 15 89 1.1
crayfish 12 13 82 0.9
shrimp 11 19 119 0.9
pollock 11 18 111 0.8
octopus 9 28 164 0.8
halibut 11 17 111 0.8
fish roe 13 18 143 0.8
haddock 10 19 116 0.8
white fish 10 18 108 0.8
clam 9 25 142 0.8
scallop 8 22 111 0.7
rockfish 10 17 109 0.7
salmon 11 20 156 0.7

 

Dairy

food ND insulin load (g/100g) calories/100g MCA
whey powder 10 82 339 1.6
cream cheese (low fat) 12 19 105 1.0
cottage cheese (low fat) 6 14 72 0.5
parmesan cheese 3 35 420 0.4
cottage cheese (low fat) 7 13 81 0.4
cheddar (non-fat) 6 20 173 0.3
mozzarella 4 26 304 0.3

 

Grains

food ND insulin load (g/100g) calories/100g MCA
oat bran 6 65 246 0.7
baker’s yeast 10 16 105 0.5
baking powder 2 45 97 0.4
wheat bran 8 34 216 0.4
rye flour 0 58 325 0.4
quinoa 1 22 120 0.1

 

Legumes

food ND insulin load (g/100g) calories/100g MCA
cowpeas 2 68 336 0.8
black beans 2 63 341 0.6
soybeans 3 49 446 0.6
pinto beans 1 64 347 0.6
kidney beans 1 63 337 0.6
broad beans 2 54 341 0.5
peas 0 57 352 0.4

So bulking implies being in:
- a caloric surplus and 
- eating more carbs (due to higher, on average, volume training).

So if someone is at 180 pounds they need to look at generally a +15% surplus to start

Say 2200 calories on rest days and
3000 calories on workout days.

Shoot for no more than .7g of carbs per lb of BW on rest days

And about 2g per lb of BW of carbs on workout days. Notice that 360g of carbs is a lot. People commented that they would have trouble just using this list to get that amount.

So consider some additional fruits and starches after getting 3/4's from the list of his nutrient dense foods

You won't see any fruits on the list - I think that his framework on the nutrient density of fruits might not be sufficiently high to get the insulin load he's looking for, but I would have thought they would have.

Enjoy the full article here.