programs gym photos nutrition videos

Common Faults, Blunders and Workout Mistakes we see


Just a friendly reminder about our training faux pas or mistakes.  Some of the rowing I've been watching is getting ugly so this got on my mind.

Not thinking about what you are doing

If you want better results you should know what you are doing and how you can improve it.  Sloppy and inefficient rowing technique is a big one. The best way is to analyze your training (take a video) and try to improve it. Acquire a little more knowledge about your movement, activity and exercise from your coach.

Comparing yourself to often to others

Every person is unique if you haven’t seen. Everybody has different genetics and pre-conditions and circumstances. If you’re a year in with your training - you can't compare yourself with an experienced athlete who’s been training for years.  Just because you can squat the same as your bud doesn't mean you can keep up with him on full chest to deck pushups.  Don't crane and slump and do a 3/4 pushup.  Except that your going to have to breakup reps and work on full ROM  Olympic lifting has so many nuances that need to be worked out to safely lift heavier weights. Try to be the best you can and work on additional drills to progress forward.

 Focusing on your Strengths Only

We all have favourite exercises but neglecting weaknesses isn’t wise. My 400m plus running skills are pitiful to what I was able to do a few years ago. I focused on lifting, squatting and gymnastics – and worked on my double unders instead.

Some people have a favourite body part to exercise but playing “Fav’s” in your training can lead to problems and unbalances. Aim for a symmetric physique, especially when squatting and doing other lifting. Being unbalanced is a great way to cause poor posture, dysfunction because of muscular imbalances, and I’d put in possible strains, pulls and worst a tear or rupture.

You haven't dialed in your nutrition program

I didn't understand how much of an impact nutrition can have on my performance until I actually began following a paleo-zone plan. As I began to learn more about nutrition and training, I researched quite a bit for over 4 years, as I dialed in my nutrition (mostly around 2010), I made real good progress in my performance while competing in '09 and '10 @ 163lbs (Had a 405DL, 335BS and 245C&J.  Eating whatever you so choose is great -and delicious but don’t expect to get optimal results without properly fueling your body.  Your body needs an adequate amount of macronutrients and micronutrients to help you train with intensity and recover sufficiently to allow you to continue training. Nutrition takes time; just commit yourself to it.

Not warming up properly

Before you start to work out you should warm up properly. A good warm-up gets your blood pumping warms up muscles and ligaments and mainly reduces the risk of injury and increases the effectiveness of your workout. See Chesty’s board back by the boxes for some further guidance.

Resting too much

It's true that you shouldn't over train yourself but taking too much time in between your squat sets can decrease the training benefits. Talk to your mates after class

Comparing yourself to often to others

Every person is unique if you haven’t seen. Everybody has different genetics and pre-conditions and circumstances. If you’re a year in with your training - you can't compare yourself with an experienced athlete who’s been training for years.   Olympic lifting has so many nuances that need to be worked out to safely lift heavier weights. Try to be the best you can and work on additional drills to progress forward.

Setting Unrealistic Goals

Ask yourself what are your goals. Are they realistic? Be honest with yourself about:

  • your abilities
  • your level of commitment
  • and your lifestyle

Then you can start to set appropriate goals with your coaches.

Understand where you’re at. You’ll definitely progress at a reasonable rate Setting lofty goals may just get you frustrated.

Long Term Planning

Progress in lifting/training is not linear. As a beginner, you'll get better quick. However, this will slow down. There will come a time when you aren’t PR'ing every month. Stick to the programmed numbers. If you try to move too quickly, without focusing on the basic strength principles, technique, mobility and stability, you'll put yourself at risk for getting injured. Don't push your limits in the gym.  Again your central nervous system is heavily impacted with our higher intensity lifts.  Fatigue will increase as you continue to press for more strength.  Improper recovery will result in more difficult days ahead, and ultimately impacting your progress.

As well as Doing too much Volume too early in your training

More doesn’t mean better. Your body needs rest to adapt. Muscle cells, ligaments and even your central nervous system needs time to recover. Taxing the same muscles day in and day out with high intensity without giving them time to repair can obviously do your body a disservice.

Focusing on Quantity over Quality

Learning the right way to exercise is essential to get results. Form always matters, especially when you do all the real legitimate exercises we program. Break up your sets of cleans, come down off that pull-up bar before all those wacky kips completely put out your spine, shoulders and elbows. Bad technique sets you up for potential injuries, more elbow pain and soreness.

Hope this keeps you more aware!

TBear